Poland

Some good news out of Europe for a change - Sunday 26th of November to Saturday 2nd of December

Given the general somewhat-negative emphasis of this blog, I feel duty-bound to begin with some rare good news - Catholic or secular - coming out of Europe. These news come from Poland, perhaps not entirely surprisingly.

I have my misgivings about the apparent re-Catholicisation of Poland, being generally wary of the nationalistic bend it seems to have. Anyone who knows me will know that I support nationalists in all their stripes, so long as they don't bring with them baggage of ethnic or racial ideologies. I can't claim that I have seen much of that in Poland, but I am still suspicious that the modest but noteworthy increase in Catholic social life in Poland has more to do with the Poles trying to craft out a national identity. In this  context, turning to Catholicism works very well since it unites a large chunk of Poles - presumably even German Poles - given that it is not on purely ethnic lines, and they can be unified in Catholic grandeur, which built all that is good about Europe. It also manages to differentiate Poland from its secularist/atheist enemies to the West and North - primarily Germany and the Nordic countries -  and it's long-time Orthodox adversaries - in the form of Russia - to the East. It also allows them to keep out Muslims on the culture card, without getting into issues of Islam itself.

Credit where credit is due though, and the news that Poland was going to phase out Sunday trade by the year 2020 was some of the best news that I have heard or read in a very long time. It is something which wreaks of a true religious revival - which whatever the intentions from the political class - might actually end up being long-lasting, regardless of who comes to or stays in power in the country. Naturally the leftists, or so I have been informed, were opposed to it, but it would seem as though the cultural marxist's general treachery to the Polish people will not be soon forgotten and it would seem as though the Law and Justice party or some similar nationalistic entity in Poland will be there for a while.

Furthermore, it is politically difficult to get rid of Sunday as a day of rest given that I am pretty sure that the Sunday rest was abolished by the communists, and one does not make many friends in Poland by making oneself a defender of Soviet policies. It's a very shrewd political move, and I applaud it unhesitatingly.

Sticking to Europe, we have more proof of its downfall in a handful of stories. In Germany and other places they have started decorating their 'diversity barriers', wrapping them up as Christmas presents. That's the most appropriate term for the barriers that they have put up on pedestrian walkways and roads leading to Christmas markets. Since we all know why they have to be put up in the first place, it would be much more honest to just paint a picture of Mohammed on them rather than pretend that they are part of the Christmas attire. I should point out that the town centre close to where I live has also put up diversity barriers - presumably to protect its Christmas market -, but alas has not gone to the trouble of wrapping up.

We were also informed that the Muslim population in Europe is set to grow, up to 25% of the population in some places, by the year 2050, and that is with zero immigration.

The Muslims do the right thing in having children, and that is to be applauded. It is the West which is to be chided for deriding the miracle of procreation. That snobbery may well prove to be its downfall, and it will be just reward for its open-armed embrace of the culture of death.

In the U.K. there was a feminist march, and feminists did what they do best which is to display their stupidity and entitlement. One of them even took the trouble to inform people that the Bible is more violent than the Koran. She should know, she told us, being a former Catholic herself. It has featured as one of my day's comments, but I'll reproduce 2 very poignant parts of the analysis from Tantumblogo. The first one clearly lays the blame for the woman's ignorance for the Novus Ordo, and I naturally agree:

“I’ve read passages [of the Koran] and the Bible is a lot more violent.  I should know, I’m a former Catholic.”  Another triumph for the post-conciliar Church!

The second one was his take on feminism itself, and feminists in general:

Which brings me to my final point – I will probably offend some in saying this, or how I say this, but I have long had a sense that many feminists are really little more than out of control teenage daughters who keep acting more and more outrageously in the increasingly forlorn hope that “dad” – society, males at large, whatever – will rein them in.  And the longer they are allowed to continue acting out, the more hurt and upset and, subsequently radicalized, they become.  It’s like they are a toddler constantly trying to find some boundary that daddy will set for them.  In their rage in finding none in the collectively weak Western men of the past 60 years, they will even turn to the cruel, draconian authoritarianism of islam to find some entity that seems to care about them enough to tell them no, to set firm limits, and make them turn over the dang car keys.

It is difficult to disagree with that either. As I wrote in my comment to the bizarreness of the whole spectacle:

I am also at a loss to understand what these women are marching for, given that the laws in most formerly Christian countries can hardly favour women more. The

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A week of wonderful anniversaries - Sunday 8th to Saturday 14th of October

The major news this week were of course the 100th anniversary of The Miracle of the Sun at Fatima. Even I took the time to write down some thougths about this great and truly unique event.

Much was written about the Fatima anniversary, the best of which was by Roberto di Mattei on Rorate Caeli, in which he went through how 9 popes have failed to consecrate Russia ever since the Fatima apparitions.

In Poland they had a Rosary Crusade of sorts, although that particular Rosary Crusade was held in honour of the Feast of the Holy Rosary, some few days earlier. The Church in Poland encouraged the event and even senior of the governments got in on the act. It is very nice to see the Carholic faith flourishing in Poland, but I do fear that Catholicism in Poland has a nationalist strain to it which tends more to be a national marker than true discipleship. I hope I am wrong, because it would be terrible if the faith in Poland went the way of the faith in Ireland, where it seems more and more as though for the majority of the Catholics, the faith was something to mark them as not being loyal subjects of an occupying power. It's difficult to analyse the collapse post-Vatican II in any other way.

While it is always good to see Rosaries being prayed, there was a political aspect to the campain in Poland and that was the anti-immigration stance. The Rosary stations formed a perimeter around the whole country, in a symbolic gesture to the EU to leave Poland alone and stop forcing Islamisation upon it.

The aim of the Poles in wanting to protect their cultural, religious and even ethnic identity is very laudable and I very much support them in that. However, I cannot but point out that it is very hypocritical of the Poles to cry when their sovereignty is threatened while at the same time supporting the attacks on the sovereignty on others.

The truth is that Poland, according to polls, is the most pro-American country in the world. I do not have any direct memory of Poland's stance, but I would be extremely surprised, even shocked, if it was to turn out that Poland had been against any of the American misadventures in Muslim countries which have acted as the catalyst for what is commonly dubbed the "refugee crisis", a very misleading label, of course. The attacks that spring most to mind are those of Iraq, Libya and most recently Syria, although we should also remember Yemen and Afghanistan, from where many of the refugees who make it to Sweden hail, for some unkown reason.

It would be one thing if the Poles resisted for some other reason, but Poland resists, and I have to argue plays the victim card, precisely because its sovereignty was attached first by the Germans, then the Soviets and now lately the EU. Given that it is precisely soverignty, territorial and cultural integrity that the U.S. has been attacking the most, with Polands presumed backing if not encouragement, I would like to argue that the Poles have no recourse to the moral high ground in their stance against the EU. Nonetheless, I do stand with Poland on that particular issue, hypocritical as the country may be.

We had Trump repealing the contraceptive mandate, among others, from the Obama regime which came before him, something very much welcomed by all non-leftists. It is a bit of a scandal that it took so long. It was actually part of a series of administrative policies which the Trump administration took which were very encouraging. It was not all plain sailing though as they for some reason still continue to defend the homosexualisation, demoralisation and immoralisation of American society by insisting that homosexuals are a protected civil rights group as defined by the Civil Rights Act, in plain contradiction of the act. The U.S. bishops, as is par for the course, have been worse than worthless on this issue and many like it.

Staying on the topic of the U.S. and the aforementioned foreign aggressions, a very interesting piece was published on the Ron Paul Institute titled "US Violence Abroad Begets Violence at Home". A new study shows that the number of deaths caused by the U.S. since the Second World War, if I undrstand the piece properly. The number of countries the U.S. has attacked is staggering, and worth remembering is that not a single one of those nations actually attacked the U.S. or posed a threat to U.S. security - as if posing a threat was in any way a justification for attacking them, it must be noted. As I wrote on the day, we have become somewhat desensitised to American brutality: "It's what they do" thinks the world, and "It's what we do", Americans seem to think, but we owe it to the victims of this violence to remember them.

The context of his piece was the recent Las Vegas massacre, whose narrative, it must be admitted, grows all the more unbelievable.

We had an article by Jennifer Lahl on egg 'donation', written by a woman who had donated her eggs. She suffered adverse effects on which she had not counted and about which she had not been informed. It was a sad read, and one thing that struck me was how bad she felt at realising that the doctors saw her as nothing but a product to produce eggs, while of course, she was there in essence facilitating the treatment of children as products through IVF technologies. It just goes to show how much trouble a little abstract thinking can save us, especially when it comes to morality.

A week's summary would hardly be complete without a Bergoglio scandal, or a Bergoglio heresy, or not infrequently both. This time it is the death penalty, which Bergoglio says...

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