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  1. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    Since the Council, an idea has been spreading that Judaism is not superseded by the New Covenant of Jesus Christ; that Jews still have available to them the Covenant of the old Law, by which they can be saved. It is therefore unnecessary for them to turn to Christ; unnecessary for anybody to convert them to faith in Christ. Indeed, attempting to do so is an act of aggression not dissimilar to theFr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com11
  2. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    S Paul loved his fellow Jews, his 'kinsmen' and believed "the gifts and call of God are irrevocable". He believed that at the End, those among them who had rejected Christ would be brought in to the chosen people. He believed that they were like olive branches which had been cut off so that the Gentiles, wild olive branches, could be grafted in. But, when the fulness of the Gentiles had entered Fr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com3
  3. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    Lex orandi lex credendi. I have been examining the Two Covenant Dogma: the fashionable error that God's First Covenant, with the Jews, is still fully and salvifically valid, so that the call to saving faith in Christ Jesus is not made to them. The 'New' Covenant, it is claimed, is now only for Gentiles. I want to draw attention at this point to the witness of the post-Conciliar Magisterium of theFr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com13
  4. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    We have seen that the Two Covenant Theory, the idea that Jewry alone is guaranteed Salvation without any need to convert to Christ, is repugnant to Scripture, to the Fathers, even to the post-Conciliar liturgy of the Catholic Church. It is also subversive of the basic grammar of the relationship between the Old and the New Testaments. Throughout  two millennia, in Scripture, in Liturgy, in her Fr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com7
  5. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    The sort of people who would violently reject the points I am making are the sort of people who would not be impressed by the the Council of Florence. So I am going to confine myself to the Magisterium from the time of Pius XII ... since it is increasingly coming to be realised that the continuum of processes which we associate with the Conciliar and post-Conciliar period was already in operationFr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com0
  6. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    In 1980, addressing a Jewish gathering in Germany, B John Paul II said (I extract this from a long sentence): " ... dialogue; that is, the meeting between the people of the Old Covenant (never revoked by God, cf Romans 11:29) and that of the New Covenant, is at the same time ..." In 2013, Pope Francis, in the course of his Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii gaudium, also referred to the Old Fr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com10
  7. Site: Fr Hunwicke's Mutual Enrichment
    0 sec ago
    Continues ...  I should add that Jesse Billett gives critical editions of three unregarded liturgical fragments, relegated to 'Appendix' status but all of them important and with each detail treated with scrupulous attention. I have not checked through the tables which are a prominent feature of the book and which make it easier to follow his discussion, but, in what I have looked at, I have not Fr John Hunwickehttp://www.blogger.com/profile/17766211573399409633noreply@blogger.com2
  8. Site: Call Me Jorge...
    37 min 56 sec ago



    "A small ceremony was started in the place, he asked us for the rings and he asked us if there was love in our marriage, if we wanted to continue together our entire lives," said Carlos Ciuffardi, cabin crewman and brand new husband of Paula Podest, cabin manager.

    The Pope asked Ciuffardi if Paula was still the boss, to which she replied "yes".

    "And I'm still the boss," she added smiling.source: La Cronica, Papa realiza primera boda en avión

    Francis presides at the wedding ceremony of Latam Airlines flight attendants Carlos Ciuffardi Elorriaga and Paula Podest Ruiz, civilly married for ten years with two daughters — Rafaella, 6, and Isabella, 3.
    Paula Podest Ruiz, 39, and Carlos Ciuffardi Elorriga, 41, told Francisco that they were married as a civilian, and although they had planned their religious ceremony in a church in Santiago, it could not be carried out because it suffered serious damage in the earthquake of 2010.

    Because of this, the crew members asked for the blessing for their marriage. But he had something else in mind.

    "Do you want me to marry you?" Asked the Supreme Pontiff. "Here?" Replied the astonished spouses.

    The Pope said yes and made a brief ceremony in the front of the plane.

    Ignacio Cueto, chairman of the board of LATAM Airlines, was an official witness and a document was signed by a Chilean bishop on board.

    "Everything is valid. Everything is official, "said Vatican spokesman Greg Burke. "We will show you an image of the document later," he added.

    source: Circulo Rojo de Mexico,EL PAPA FRANCISCO CELEBRA BODA EN PLENO VUELO



    Bride Paola Podest, 39, and groom Carlos Ciuffardi, 41, said “I do” after telling Francis that they had been married in a civil service in 2010 but had been unable to follow up with a church ceremony because of the Feb. 27, 2010, earthquake that rocked Chile.

    Francis then offered to marry the LATAM flight attendants aboard the aircraft en route to the northern city of Iquique, and they readily agreed. The head of the airline served as the witness.

    “He told me it’s historic, that there has never before been a pope who married someone aboard a plane,” Ciuffardi told journalists in the aisle of the Airbus 321.

    Ciuffardi said the pope also told them: “This is the sacrament that is missing in the world, the sacrament of marriage. May this motivate others to get the sacrament of marriage. I’ll do it for this reason.”

    source: Time, Pope Francis Performs First Airborne Papal Wedding During Flight in Chile
    The hand-written document, signed by Francis, attesting to the wedding of  Paula Podest Ruiz and Carlos Ciuffardi Elorriaga aboard the papal plane.
    The remarkable wedding transpired seemingly spontaneously, as is often the case with the ever-surprising Francis: The flight crew was gathering in the front of the plane for a photo with the pope when the couple told him they were married and he motioned for them to sit next to him.

    "We told him that we are husband and wife, that we have two daughters and that we would have loved to receive his blessing," Ciuffardi said. "All of a sudden he asked us if we were married in the church, too."

    The couple explained that their church's bell tower had fallen during the quake, forcing the cancellation of the service. One thing led to another, and they never followed up.

    "He liked us and he asked, 'Do you want me to marry you?'" Ciuffardi recounted. "He asked: 'Are you sure?' 'Yes, of course!' we said."

    A Vatican official hastily drew up an official, albeit handwritten marriage certificate, stating that the two had consented to the sacrament of marriage on Jan. 18 and that Francis had celebrated the marriage "aboard the papal plane from Santiago to Iquique."

    A stunned Podest was nearly speechless during the remaining hour on the flight as she recounted the story to the 70 or so journalists who travel with the pope on his foreign trips.

    She said Francis offered a bit of advice to the not-so-newlyweds: "The wedding rings shouldn't be too tight, because they'll torture you, but if they're too loose, they'll fall off. So we have to be careful," she said blushing.

    Podest said she and Ciuffardi had also explained to Francis that when they first started dating, she was his boss at LATAM. Francis asked if she was still the boss, and both readily agreed.

    "And that's why the marriage works," Ciuffardi said.

    After applause — and a breakfast of fresh fruit, croissants, coffee and tea — the plane landed in Iquique and the couple bid the passengers farewell.

    "We hope you had a good flight," the bride said.

    source: ABC 13 News, Love in the air: Pope marries couple on papal plane in Chile


  9. Site: RT - News
    1 hour 2 min ago
    Author: RT
    British PM Theresa May and French President Emmanuel Macron have signed a treaty that will see the UK increase funding for security measures along France’s border.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  10. Site: RT - News
    1 hour 13 min ago
    Author: RT
    Terrorists in Iraq and Syria have learnt to produce chemical weapons and there’s a real threat they may be used outside the region, Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov told the UN Security Council.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  11. Site: RT - News
    1 hour 27 min ago
    Author: RT
    Following in Facebook’s footsteps, Twitter has announced it will let users know if they had interacted with content generated by “Russian trolls” during the 2016 US presidential election.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  12. Site: southern orders
    1 hour 54 min ago

    Our bishop just issued recommendations concerning the horrible flu season we are having in our diocese. Here it is (my comments/rants at the end):

    To all priests and deacons,
    Given the severity of the flu this season across the United States, particularly in the State of Georgia and bordering states, pastors may decide to suspend distributing the Eucharist in sharing a common cup. The option of course could  be to continue to offer the precious blood by cup and people can make their own choice whether they wish to share it or not, which is the normal practice. But if pastors decide to suspend the use of the cup, it must be understood that it is only a temporary precaution against the spread of influenza. This should not be used as an opportunity to discontinue the use of the cup at the end of this epidemic. Proper catechesis should be utilized if there is a suspension of the cup.  
    This decision will be left up to each individual pastor as to when such a practice will begin and end.
    The same will hold true to those congregations that have the custom of holding hands during the Our Father. 
    People who have the symptoms or the diagnosis of the flu should also be instructed to stay home on the weekend rather than come to Mass for fulfillment of an obligation.  
    I would also appreciate taking precautions by not mingling with large crowds of people on weekends and washing hands frequently.

    My comments/rants: I hate when things fall on me. I like to blame others. That's number one.
    But in addition to this I can't stand the fact that we provide the common chalice to the congregation knowing full well that germs, viruses and other diseases can be spread regardless of the flu season that is more severe than usual.

    Why is this? Because when the laity received permission to have the common chalice in the early 1970's there was reluctance on their part to drink from the chalice, so the first method was intinction which was wonderful. I remember it full well.

    But then those damn, rigid liturgists said intinction wasn't biblical and that it was like "dunking donuts" and thus not reverent! So they insisted that intinction be dropped (please note, there was no official requiest from Rome to stop intinction because it is still allowed even in the new GIRM!!!

    But to convince the laity they should drink from the common chalice these damn rigid liturgists told us to tell a lie that wiping the rim of the chalice with a purificator and turning the chalice would eliminate any risk of contagion. This is a lie (bald or bold face?).

    But the other ideology this damn, rigid liturgists wanted to foist onto the liturgy was the proliferation of Extraordinary Ministers of Holy Communion. Make no mistake, this was the goal, for better or for worse. 

    And intinction meant the communicant couldn't receive in the hand and that ideology was more important than health and preserving reverence for Holy Communion. 

    I have been ranting about the danger of the spread of contagion for longer than I can remember.

    Will it take multi million dollar lawsuits to end it, to create zero tolerance for the common chalice?
    History tells us yes!

    In the meantime, those bishops and priests at Vatican papal Masses  do not ever drink from the common chalice but in fact intinct with papal approbation. When will we learn from the Holy Father and Rome?

    And no,I will not ban the common chalice at St. Anne's but warn people as our bishop recommends. Only when there is a consistent band based upon common sense will I abolish the common chalice and resort to intinction!
  13. Site: Novus Motus Liturgicus
    2 hours 3 min ago
    In the Italian city of Tolentino, located in the Marches region, the church of the Sacred Heart and St Benedict was badly damaged by the same earthquakes that wrought so much devastation in nearby Norcia. After a year of restoration, the church has now been restored and reopened, thanks in part to a generous contribution from the Hungarian government. On December 9th, Pontifical First Vespers of the feast of Our Lady of Loreto, patron of Italy, and particularly of that region of central Italy, in which Loreto is located, were celebrated by Bishop Giuseppe Sciacca, Secretary of the Apostolic Segnatura, in the presence of Mons. Nazzareno Marconi, the bishop of Macerata and Tolentino, and Mons. Lajos Varga, auxiliary bishop of Vác, Hungary. Members of local religious confraternities and Juventutem groups were present, as well some of the Monks of Norcia. An official delegation of the Hungarian government was also present, including the ambassadors to the Holy See and the Italian State; the undersecretary for religious affairs, Miklós Soltész, read a message of congratulations from Prime Minister Viktor Orbán to the community of Tolentino: “Following this terrible destruction, you have been an example of perseverance to us all, restoring in one year the walls of your church, so that you can continue in this ancient building, now renewed, the prayer begun by your fathers.”

    Our thanks to Dr Andrea Carradori, prior of the Confraternity of the Sacred Heart, for sharing this information and these photos with us.




    Bishop Marconi unveils a plaque in Italian and Hungarian commemorating the restoration.






    Members of the local confraternities.

  14. Site: Ron Paul Institute - Featured Articles
    2 hours 5 min ago
    Author: Daniel McAdams
    Why are the rich getting richer? Are they just smarter than the rest of us? Or do the "too big to fail" connected corporations have a hotline to Washington for government assistance? And what about the US involvement in the Middle East? Will it increase or decrease this year? And why? Internationally-renowned trends forecaster Gerald Celente joins today's Liberty Report to tell us what we can expect for 2018:

  15. Site: RT - News
    2 hours 9 min ago
    Author: RT
    Turkey is gearing up to move troops toward Afrin, a Kurdish-held area of Syria. The battle over the tiny enclave, which many would struggle to find on the map, could put Ankara in open conflict with NATO ally the US – here’s how.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  16. Site: What Is Up With The Synod?
    2 hours 21 min ago
    Author: Hilary White
    …ain’t all it’s cracked up to be. Hey! Remember that time a while back when we said the whole Sovereign Military Order of Malta kerfuffle was aimed at the effective suppression of the religious aspect of the Knights and the reduction of the order to
  17. Site: RT - News
    2 hours 21 min ago
    Author: RT
    Shocking footage shows people being knocked down and dragged around like tumbleweed as extremely powerful winds sweep across the Netherlands. The deadly storm grounded transport and took rooftops to the air across northern Europe.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  18. Site: RT - News
    2 hours 38 min ago
    Author: RT
    A pair of teenagers, who got into difficulty while swimming off the Australian coast, were saved by a lifeguard-piloted drone in what is thought to be a world first.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  19. Site: RT - News
    2 hours 49 min ago
    Author: RT
    While the Pentagon is struggling to choose how to cover a gap in short-range air defense, the US Army is rushing to train troops in Europe to use the shoulder-fired version of the Stinger missile, famed for its use by the Taliban.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  20. Site: Peter Hitchens blog
    2 hours 49 min ago
    Author: DM

    How long can the Archbishop of Canterbury refuse to accept his own review of the George Bell case? The Carlile inquiry clearly showed in December that Bell would have been acquitted of the child abuse charge against him in any properly constituted and run court of law on any standard of proof. Yet the Church of England still refuses to rehabilitate him fully, and the Archbishop continues to insist that a cloud hangs over his reputation.

    It is hard to see what legal or moral reasoning justifies this position, in a country where innocence is presumed until guilt is proven, and in a church which stands above all things for justice and truth.

    New developments in the case suggest that Mr Welby must either act, or explain precisely and clearly why he does not act, and soon.

    In this morning’s Daily Telegraph, it was reported that a group of seven highly distinguished academics, including Sir Ian Kershaw (whose vast, magisterial biography of Hitler is the standard text in English), and the noted writer on Churchill and the appeasement era, Professor John Charmley, *** have written to the Church of England’s senior prelate in astonishingly severe terms, criticising his behaviour in the matter.  

    The Telegraph reports them as having written ‘None of us may be considered natural critics of an Archbishop of Canterbury. But we must also draw a firm line. The statement of December 15 2017 (in which the Archbishop asserted that a cloud still hung over George Bell’s reputation) seems to us both irresponsible and dangerous. We therefore urge you, in all sincerity, to repudiate what you have said before more damage is done and this to restore the esteem in which the high, historic office to which you have been called, has been held.’

    People used to the often robust language of this blog should understand that such language in the mouths of such distinguished members of the establishment, addressed to someone as revered as an Archbishop must be, is written in letters of fire.  I am amazed by its force and barely restrained implied anger.

    The historians (who regard George Bell as a significant figure in history) said they wished ‘to express our profound dismay with the position you have taken’. They said the Archbishop’s statement ‘offended basic values and principles of historical understanding’. It assumed a single allegation had been proved when it had not.

    ‘The allegation [Against Bishop Bell] is not only wholly uncorroborated but is contradicted by all the considerable, and available, circumstantial material which any historian would consider credible’, they wrote.

    They added ‘We cannot understand how such an unsupported, indeed insupportable, allegation can be upheld by a responsible public authority. Quite simply, it is indefensible.’ (my emphasis, PH)

    They pointed out that the Archbishop had argued that lord Carlile had not ruled on George Bell’s innocence or guilt – but this was precisely because the Archbishop had given him terms of reference which prevented him from doing so.  (In fact, as you may see below, Lord Carlile has come about as close as he possibly can to declaring Bishop Bell’s innocence, in remarks made since the report was published).

    The historians were unequivocal.'We state our position bluntly. There is no credible evidence at all that Bishop Bell was a paedophile. We state this after reviewing all that is known about his character and behaviour over many years’.

    Stating that George Bell had been impugned from within his own Church, they flatly contradicted Mr Welby, saying ‘There is today no cloud at all over Bishop Bell. Nobody employing credible critical method could think otherwise’.

    I would add to this the following words, spoken by Lord Carlile in an interview given to the Argus of Brighton on 16th December 2017 here

    http://www.theargus.co.uk/news/15776905.Victim_____He_can_say_Bishop_Bell_wouldn___t_be_found_guilty__it_doesn___t_change_the_facts___/

    , soon after he issued his report:

    Lord Carlile said the process followed by the Church was ‘deficient in several ways… The statement [condemning Bishop Bell, in October 2015] was wrong, it should never have been issued. It was quite wrong, and I think if one looks at the process, the process went just horribly wrong.

    Lord Carlile, a QC, added: ‘I’ve prosecuted and defended a lot of cases including a lot of sex cases, and there’s absolutely no prospect that a criminal case against him would have succeeded.

    ‘I think even if it had been brought in 1951 or 1952, I don’t think it would have succeeded.

    ‘But in any event a complaint wasn’t made until 37 years after he died. And by that time there would have been absolutely no chance, had he been living, of him being convicted.’

    It would be very hard for Lord Carlile to have been any less equivocal.

    So what does this mean? Picture this: A Justice Minister,  after hearing serious evidence from serious people commissions a learned lawyer to look into a case of alleged injustice against a man now languishing in prison.

    The lawyer reports to him that it is indeed a case of injustice, showing that the imprisoned man was convicted on inadequate and dubious evidence in a bungled trial, during which his defence was not given a proper hearing and important defence witnesses were neither sought nor examined.

    And the Justice Secretary says ‘thanks all the same, but I still believe there is a cloud over the accused man’s reputation’, and leaves him in prison.

    The above is more or less an exact parallel of the behaviour of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Revd Justin Welby. The difference is that the accused, the late Bishop George Bell, has been dead since 1958 and it is his reputation which remains confined in a dungeon, from which Justin Welby could release it with a word, but will not.

    Why does he not do this?  

     

    ***The other historians are Charmian Brinson, Andrew Chandler,Michael J.Hughes, Jeremy Noakes and Keith Robbins***

  21. Site: THE TENTH CRUSADE
    2 hours 54 min ago
    so the problem with this, of course, is that this is yet another confirmation that he wishes to teach that douses are dispensable. The permanence of marriage is so insignificant, that one can literally get married without any discernment about compatibility, shared common goals.

    Rob your family and loved ones of being present.


    No guidance or catechesis or survival tools are necessary.  Rob the people who know and love you the most from advisory roles on conflicts they see that challenge permanence.  Immaturity, incompatibility, addictions.   There is no need to have a handle on what the Sacrament is and means and what you are promising when you make the vow.  It can be done outside of the Sanctuary, on a plane or in a public restroom.  Anyone who advises you differently-- be it a parent or a priest--is sourpus who doesn't know Church teaching is the enemy of love.

    And let us face it: the validity of this does not survive canonical scrutiny.





  22. Site: Father Ed Tomlinson's Blog
    3 hours 15 min ago
    Author: Admin

    When two air stewards on the papal flight over Chile requested a blessing on their relationship Pope Francis opted instead to conduct an impromptu wedding. As senior legislator of the church he is presumably able to bypass canon law in this maverick manner. But whilst the media delight in the feel good story, and whilst I presume the Holy Father understands better than me, I must confess it leaves me a little uneasy. It feels more like a PR stunt than a properly conducted sacrament.

    For what does this say about the seriousness of holy matrimony? The wedding liturgy states that marriage must never be entered into lightly; yet this feels light given that nobody presumably got onto that flight expecting it to happen??! So unless this was a stunt, and the couple were secretly prepared, questions arise regarding discernment and validity. Did the couple properly prepare themselves? And if the Holy Father did not know the couple- how can he have discerned the suitability? What if there were impediments? What checks were conducted?

    Doubtless others will suggest the couple were ready because they were already civilly married. But surely the reverse must be true? If they understood and cherished Catholic teaching regarding marriage…why did they neglect it previously? A need for catechesis suggests itself  yet I cannot fathom how such teaching was given or even available.

    Finally the church has been on record stating that clergy are not exhaustive enough with marriage preparation and thereby fail couples. This event seems to undermine that message. What would a bishop say if a priest married a couple he met that day on a flight without recourse to canon law?

    Naturally I wish the couple well. But it does seem a strange event and somewhat misjudged. Maybe I am being a sourpuss, and if so I apologise, but I cannot see how knee-jerk nuptials convey Christian teaching on marriage. Perhaps readers of this blog can help clear up my confusion and put my mind at rest?

  23. Site: RT - News
    3 hours 21 min ago
    Author: RT
    Trump wants to pull back some of the thunder to Washington as North and South Korea resumed talks, says attorney Eric Sirotkin. That is disturbing to the military industrial complex, Anti-war Answer Coalition’s Brian Becker added.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  24. Site: Catholic Herald
    3 hours 28 min ago
    Author: Staff Reporter

    Home Secretary Amber Rudd has asked “interested parties” with experience of pro-life vigils outside abortion clinics to have their say as part of a Government consultation. The Home Office has launched a review into alleged “harassment” by pro-lifers outside abortion clinics. It is considering whether new powers are needed to protect people going to the clinic or working...

    Source

  25. Site: RT - News
    3 hours 38 min ago
    Author: RT
  26. Site: Peter Hitchens blog
    4 hours 23 min ago
    Author: DM

    When I agreed a bit reluctantly to speak in Copenhagen earlier this month, I decided to make the journey to Denmark by train. I was bound to take a week’s holiday to make the trip anyway. Why not make a proper journey of it? And so I did. And because that journey left me so refreshed and exhilarated, I thought I would write about it here. There; no special purpose to this, except that writing about it helps to fix it and focus it in my mind.

    Those of you who already know the fascinating website run by ‘The Man in Seat 61’ will know that he can explain to nervous travellers that almost anywhere in continental Europe can now be reached easily without having anything to do with airports.

    You can of course still sometimes use ferries, and I plan to do this more in future, as I treasure memories (from the 1980s) of riding my bike straight off the Portsmouth boat into the lovely old streets of St Malo, with the whole of France open before me.

    But this time I didn’t have the leisure. I planned a journey by Eurostar to Brussels, a quick dive down the subway to catch the train to Cologne, then up to Hamburg for the Copenhagen express that leaves Hamburg every morning at about 9.30, leaving plenty of time for a decent breakfast.

    The Eurostar’s great charm is its simplicity, though I still wish it would dispense with the silly airport-type ‘security’. As far as I know, there is no such palaver for travellers through the   Gotthard Base Tunnel, which was recently opened in Switzerland. At a little over 35 miles, the Gotthard Base Tunnel is significantly longer than the Channel Tunnel (which is a little over 31 miles long). It is also far deeper. The Channel Tunnel is on average 148 feet deep. The Gotthard Base Tunnel has a maximum depth of 8,040 feet.  I believe the Japanese have now also built an undersea  railway tunnel longer than the Dover-Calais one.

    Of course I am delighted to show my passport to leave the country and enter someone else’s, and very much favour this (see below).

    But a baggage search and a walk through an x-ray portal, sometiumes followed by a pat-down body-search,  seem to me to be superfluous flim-flam, yet another aspect of the disproportionate application of ‘security’, which makes life less joyous without making it significantly safer. Are car passengers on the Eurotunnel shuttles compelled to undergo anything of the kind? I have never done this and have no idea.

    I also don’t see why passengers, once they have shown their tickets and passports, cannot just amble up to the platform and board the train, as they would if they were on any other rail journey. Instead there is once more the pretence that the train is an aircraft (railway managers seem to long to make their trains more like planes – with ‘aircraft-type’ seating, endless announcements, including talk of being ‘on the approach’ to Wolverhampton etc. Don’t they realise this is what we are going by train to avoid?  Does it cross their minds that some people actually like travelling by train because it is a train, not a plane? Probably not).

    The Eurostar gates, as at an airport, are kept shut until a pre-set moment, whereupon everyone rushes to the escalator at once. Why? If I wanted to go to an airport, I wouldn’t be using the Eurostar.

    But there. The moment when the train glides away from the St Pancras platform, with all this messing-around over, is a great liberation, and if only there was a proper restaurant car on board, it would be pretty near perfection.

    The journey to Brussels or Paris is not especially scenic. High-Speed trains need flat, boring countryside and loathe winding valleys and riverbanks. And you quickly get used to the fact that you are not in England – the bigger fields, the almost total absence of birds, the differently shaped church towers and the different designs of electricity pylons. I have always found this a good game to play: ‘How do I know I am not now in England?’ Alas, it gets harder as England gets more like everywhere else.

    And the journey to Brussels is amazingly quick. You can get there as fast as you can get to York. On such lines, high-speed rail is justified, as it is not in England, where the distances are so much shorter and the density of the countryside so much greater. If it were not for the absurd low fares of the no-frills airlines, almost everyone with any sense would now leave the country this way.

    And Brussels is a good starting point. You can go to Amsterdam, or Antwerp, or Ghent (much recommended) with ease. And you can go further still. Many years ago, I’d guess in 1978, in Brussels for some Common Market briefing, I had a sudden Friday afternoon impulse to which I owe much of the rest of my life’s pattern. It was deep winter. Realising that a long weekend was upon me, that I didn’t have to be back at work till the following Tuesday and that I could change my flight back from the Belgian capital (no Eurostar in those days), I headed down to the station and asked about tickets to Berlin.

    I found I could easily afford one, and that if I stayed over in Cologne that night at an ultra-cheap station hotel, I could be in Berlin by teatime on Saturday. I telephoned an old friend then living in Berlin, where I had never then been, and arranged to have supper with him on Saturday. I’d experienced the German world before, but in its southern version – a prep-school ski trip to the (then obscure) resort of Lech in 1963, a solid, pretty Germany scented with coffee and cigar smoke, of good bread, majestic plumbing and slightly constipated contentment, which instantly appealed to me.  I have been a Germanophile of sorts ever since, though what really tugs at my heart is the pre-1914 Germany, whose enormous great bones you can still see at some of the big-city railway stations (above all Dresden), redolent of 20th century optimism, social democracy and prosperity, which might have continued in beaming tranquillity had things turned out slightly differently. But they didn’t, did they? And it didn’t, did it?  

    But this was a chance to take a look at a more Protestant, northern Germany, one in which the big railway stations had mostly been completely flattened, and of course at the great divide of wire and wall that then cut Germany and Berlin in two. I have not stopped thinking about this since.

    The resulting journey is one I have ever afterwards hoped to repeat, but never quite have. I met people and saw things which turned my mind ever afterwards towards the East, and led me in the end to Moscow itself (I went there by train, too on a bizarre journey during which I was approached in the dining car by a woman from the KGB). What I saw above all was the chasm between the two Europes, physically present in concrete and dazzling searchlights, and pale men in scruffy uniforms with sub-machine guns, staring down on to the Friedrichstrasse platform as I tiptoed warily into the Communist wonderland. As I stepped out on to the Unter den Linden, looked for the first time westwards through the barricaded Brandenburg Gate,  and as the pungent perfume of brown coal entered my nostrils, I was captivated. I knew which side I was on, quite clearly, but equally loved being on the enemy’s territory, seeing what he was really like. This was for me.

    As we began the Eastward journey, we curved through the thick, dark wooded hills around Liege where Ludendorff’s mighty artillery smashed its way through Belgium’s fortresses in August 1914, crossed the (West) German border near Aachen   and trundled into Cologne, where I had my first glimpse of that astonishing Cathedral, a mediaeval building left unfinished until the 19th century, when the original plans were discovered and it was completed, and then almost the last major building left standing after repeated RAF bombing.  In those days it was still patrolled by stern, fat beadles in cloaks and cocked hats worn sideways, which kept the atmosphere reverent. The last time I was there, they had gone. The world changes everywhere, whether you are there to see it or not. What you thought you knew about a foreign country will be very quickly out of date.

    But I had only a short time to look at it before the Berlin train was due. And when it trundled into the platform under the great arch of Cologne station, it was largely composed of East German carriages – a red Mitropa dining car done out inside in the fake veneer so beloved in the Communist world, Deutsche Reichsbahn (yes, the Communists still called it that) carriages in a far drabber grey-green than the West German coaches. I remember crossing the Rhine, on a bridge still decorated with imperial sculptures from before 1914, and then mainly a long, stodgy, beery lunch (GDR beer), served with stately slowness as we headed through Hanover, and how the beer eased my halting German in a long conversation with the woman sharing my table, then the crossing at Helmstedt/Marienborn when I saw my first People’s Police, and shuddered slightly. One of them wished me a pleasant journey, and my West German companion muttered ‘He’s only saying that because you’re a foreigner!’ From then on the scrubby countryside, the cobbled, narrow roads, the feeling that nothing had been painted or repaired since the news of Stalingrad had arrived, enveloped me. At Magdeburg, in later-afternoon winter sunshine, I saw a full-sized city under layers of decay and neglect, not even remotely comparable to the West German cities through which we had passed. I had seen Prague and Pilsen, but they were eastern and exotic. Magdeburg was not. Our big Western engine had been replaced by a small dirty Eastern one. Police, or perhaps troops, lined the platform to prevent any unauthorised person from boarding. We, the free passengers, could look out on the imprisoned people as if at exhibits, buying small things from platform stalls, or just standing and staring. For us it was a spectacle. For them it was the life they just had to lead. I did not enjoy it.

    Then we ran into some of the deepest darkness I had ever seen, a countryside of small cold villages poorly lit, invisible in the night, some dingy Communist suburbs in which I saw my first steam locomotives for years, and a cinema showing ‘One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’, which was approved by the Communist authorities for reasons which now seem obvious to me, but didn’t then. Then a brief halt at Griebnitzsee and immediately the sky exploded into bright light, ever prospect was lit up, sparkling, busy, painted, prosperous. We were in West Berlin. Here at last was the Zoo Station I had wanted to get off at since I had read Erich Kaestner’s ‘Emil and the Detectives’ as a child (and pretty squalid it was, despite being a showcase for capitalist freedom).  I made that journey many times afterwards, but it was never quite as good as it was that first time.

    But my more recent voyage took another route. Despite repeated breakdowns on my ultra-modern German inter-city express, I made my connection on to the Hamburg train at Cologne, with about two seconds to spare, and suddenly was swinging north, towards the Ruhr.

    This was not such a new train. But it also did not break down. The carriages were large and spacious, with compartments and big windows which gave a sense of speed missing from High-Speed services. The buffet car (done out nostalgically in fake veneer, and not unlike that 1970s Mitropa Speisewagen) served good cold beer and a reasonable ham and cheese toasted roll. I observed the Ruhr, and the great steeple of Muenster Cathedral (once the seat of Archbishop von Galen, an odd paradoxical aristocrat, Churchman, fervent nationalist and courageous troublemaker who defied Hitler over the T4 murders of mental patients, but not, alas, about much else). I am pretty certain (my mind boggled a bit at the glimpse) that I saw an actual coalmine, and some distant slag heaps, reminding me of long-ago journeys from Oxford to York which took me through the great flaring steelworks and busy coalfields of Britain, now gone. Germany still has proper industry, though it is committing a wilful green suicide and is everywhere infested with windmills, those symbols of crazy dogma out of control.

    Examined closely, the country looked a lot shabbier than I remembered it as being. When I arrived in Hamburg, there were beggars, which you would never have seen there until recently, not to mention shisha parlours everywhere. The police, once ubiquitous in their peaked caps, have vanished as thoroughly as they have in Britain. I saw two from the rear, in a  subway in Aachen, and they didn’t even call themselves ‘Polizei’, as I feel they ought to do. They had POLICE’ in big letters on what looked very like modern British uniforms. In one or two late-night streets in Hamburg, near the glorious inlet called the Alster, I found a few survivors of the past, lovely ornate pre-1914 apartments and offices, breathing the serenity of the period, perhaps the Germany Erskine Childers saw as he imagined his enjoyable thriller ‘the Riddle of the Sands’.   Or maybe the one Richard Hannay and Peter Pienaar saw on their secret mission to Berlin in ‘Greenmantle’. Solid, certain, a generous investment in a rich and peaceful future which never happened. As I wandered, I found one of those little brass plaques in the pavement,  about four inches by three, placed there by a dogged individual who seeks to commemorate every murder of a German Jew by the Nazis, in the place where that person once lived. The shoes of passers-by polish them so they usually shine. There are a lot in central Berlin.  I could not read it in the dark, and found myself kneeling on the freezing pavement to do so. I decided that this was the right posture to adopt, and said a swift prayer for the souls of the departed, which as a Protestant I am not really supposed to do. But I do it anyway.

    My Danish train from Hamburg (very small and modest next to the roaring, boastful giants of the German railways) pottered northwards through Luebeck (selected for special destruction by Arthur Harris because it was built largely of wood). It was then halted for a signal failure, the first time I have ever heard this excuse in Germany and another sign that the country isn’t what it was. They say in Germany now that ‘If you want German efficiency, you should go to Switzerland’, and I do see what they mean.

    But the little Danish train was very efficiently gathered up (it fitted perfectly) into the ferry that goes across the narrow water from Puttgarden in Germany to Rodby in Denmark. You must leave the train during the voyage, and I spent a wistful 45 minutes in the restaurant, consuming a delicious sandwich as I watched German earth and sky and water meet, on the edge of the history-crammed Baltic,  and then turned to see Denmark appearing in the north. I had never been there before, the onlky Scandinavian or Nordic country I had not visited(unless you count Greenland).  On the other side I was pleased to see Danish police blithely ignoring the Schengen Agreement which has abolished their border, and asking for passports – I was glad to present mine for inspection. I saw less of Denmark than I had hoped to on the way to Copenhagen, though I did glimpse some actual hills, but Copenhagen’s main railway station is a Nordic joy, which would probably never have survived in Germany, and Copenhagen was, likewise, a delight – compact, maritime (my hotel room, in a former Christian seaman’s hostel, looked out onto a harbourside busy with boats.)

    In the brief ,moments when I was neither haranguing, being interviewed or being plied with hospitality, I managed to see the Amalienborg, almost at midnight, the plain, austerely lovely square in which the Royal Palace stands (I watched in the freezing night wind as bearskinned guardsmen stamped their boots), and felt simultaneously very much at home and very much abroad. I also managed a swift visit to Elsinore, or Helsingor as the Danes insist on calling it, on a perfect winter days with the sea stretching across to Sweden, almost indigo and dotted with whitecaps, the curlicued renaissance castle on its promontory starting out defiantly towards Sweden. Of course ‘Hamlet’ did not happen here. But it is still like seeing Baghdad or Samarkand or Jerusalem, a place that existed in the mind and now turns out to exist in fact. And finally I managed a swift visit to the Round Tower, which I have longed to see since I first heard Hans Christian Andersen’s story  ‘The Tinder Box’ read   on the BBC Home Service, on our old brown Bakelite wireless in a Devon village 60-odd years ago. There is a dog in the story whose eyes are as big as the Round Tower in Copenhagen. I had often wondered just how big such a dog could have been. Now I know.

  27. Site: Dominus mihi adjutor
    4 hours 30 min ago
    Author: Fr Hugh
    At present I am putting together the next edition of the monastery’s annual magazine. For this I needed to scan some images from the bound volume containing past magazines from 1924. In my skim-search for the images two little articles came into my ken. Dom The monks of Douai sit rather loose to the traditional … Continue reading Of Dom and Chant: Benedictine Flashbacks →
  28. Site: southern orders
    4 hours 35 min ago
    Of course the couple was living as husband and wife in a civil union for the past 8 years because of circumstances beyond their control? Yes, there are dramatic circumstances to be sure, but for 8 years?????  But what about the paperwork? What about proving neither had previous valid marriages? What about proving they are baptized? What about marriage preparation. What about going to Confession prior to the con-validation of a civil union? I know, I know, I am a legalist doctor of the law putting protocol and law above humans and their needs, wants and desires. I am a horrible priest!

    But this is cool, no? The first pope in history ever to bless a marriage on a flight in a jet plane! From the National Catholic Register:


    Paula Podest and Carlos Ciuffardi, married by Pope Francis aboard the papal plane en route to Iquique, Chile, Jan. 18. Below, their marriage certificate drawn up by cardinals who accompanied the Pope on his flight. (Alvaro de Juana/CNA)
     |  Jan. 18, 2018
    Love Is in the Air: Pope Francis Marries Couple Mid-Flight During Chile Visit
    The Holy Father blessed the civilly married flight attendants' marriage during a flight from Santiago to Iquique, Chile. 
    ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE — In his five years in office, Pope Francis gained a reputation for tossing protocol and embracing spontaneity. Today, he did it again with another papal first: marrying two flight attendants on board his flight from Santiago to Iquique.

    According to journalists traveling with the Pope, the couple — Paula Podest and Carlos Ciuffardi — went to the Pope during the Jan. 18 flight to ask for his blessing.

    The couple told Francis they had been civilly married, but had not been able to get married in the Church because their parish was destroyed in the massive 8.8 earthquake that rocked Santiago in 2010.

    In response, the Pope offered to marry them on the spot. Ignacio Cueto, owner of the airline company, LATAM, was a witness in the ceremony.

    According to Ciuffardi, who spoke briefly with journalists after the ceremony, the Pope asked the couple if they were married yet, and when they explained why they hadn't been married in the Church, he said, “Do you want to get married?”

    The Holy Father, Ciuffardi said, asked them “Are you sure, absolutely sure?” They said Yes, gave the Pope Podest's ring and asked Cueto if he would be a witness. The Pope then blessed the ring, placed their hands together, offered some brief reflections and pronounced them husband and wife.
    According to Ciuffardi, Francis told them what happened “was historic,” because “never has a Pope married a couple on a plane.”

    Referring to the rings, Francis jested that they shouldn’t be too tight, because “they would be a torture,” nor too loose, because they might lose them.

    Since they didn't have an official marriage certificate to sign, Pope Francis asked the cardinals with him to draft one, so they grabbed a piece of blank copy paper and each signed their names and what role they played in the ceremony. One of the cardinals also signed as a witness.


    The Pope also gave the couple two rosaries, Podest received a white rosary and Ciuffardi a black one.
    The couple — who have two children, Rafaela, 6 and Isabela, 3 — said they will be traveling with the Pope to Iquique, and from there will take a different flight to another destination, and will celebrate after.

    “It was something historic, really. Very exciting,” Ciuffardi said. “What he told us was very important: He told us 'this is the sacrament that the world needs, the sacrament of marriage. Hopefully, this will motivate couples around the world to get married.’”
  29. Site: southern orders
    4 hours 52 min ago
    During Hawaii missile alert, Honolulu Catholic bishop led a penance riteWashington Post 
    On Saturday, as Hawaii residents were jolted by an alert of an incoming ballistic missile, a priest was distributing Holy Communion to a group of Catholics celebrating Mass in a chapel owned by the Diocese of Honolulu. Suddenly, a deacon interrupted him and held up a cellphone showing the incoming missile alert that went out shortly after 8 a.m. It urged people to seek immediate shelter. In the era of Kim Jong Un, residents of the Aloha State know all too well that it can take less than 30 minutes for an incoming missile to travel from North Korea to Hawaii. Despite the possibility of impending doom, the Rev. Mark Gantley, who was leading the Mass, didn’t mention the alert to worshipers or stop ...
    Read more
  30. Site: Ron Paul Institute - Featured Articles
    4 hours 55 min ago
    Author: Philip Giraldi


    There is a growing consensus among many observers in Washington that the national security agencies have become completely politicized over the past seventeen years and are now pursuing selfish agendas that actually endanger what remains of American democracy. Up until recently it has been habitual to refer to such activity as the Deep State, which is perhaps equivalent to the Establishment in that it includes financial services, the media, major foundations and constituencies, as well as lobbying groups, but we are now witnessing an evolutionary process in which the national security regime is exercising power independently.

    In a devastating critique former Central Intelligence Agency operations officer John Kiriakou has described how the Democratic Party, as part of its frenzied effort to bring down President Donald Trump, has embraced a whole group of former intelligence and law enforcement officers who appear to be on the same side in seeking a more responsible and accountable executive branch but who are in reality pursuing their own agenda.

    Formerly intelligence and law enforcement agencies acted under the direction of the White House but without any political bias. Transitions from Democratic to Republican administrations were consequently seamless for the employees of CIA, FBI, DIA and the NSA, but this has changed. In the 2016 election a line-up of retired senior officers from those organizations openly supported the Clinton campaign and even went so far as to construct elaborate conspiracy theories regarding Trump and his associates, including the claim that Donald Trump is actually an agent of Russia.

    The desire to discredit and ultimately delegitimize Trump even involved some active duty senior officers, including John Brennan, Director of CIA, who exploited Agency relationships with foreign intelligence services to develop information on Trump, and James Comey of the FBI who initiated an investigation of Trump’s associates. Both were involved in the later surfacing of the notorious Steele Dossier, a collection of fact mixed with fiction that sought to destroy the Trump presidency even before it began.

    Kiriakou cites recent activity by Brennan as well as former NSA and CIA head Michael Hayden as well as former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, all of whom have been politically active. The three men appear frequently on television as self-described “senior statesmen,” but, as Kiriakou observes they are “…monsters who have ignored the Constitution…and international law. They have committed war crimes and crimes against humanity.” They together with lesser figures like George Tenet, Jose Rodriguez, Michael Morell and John McLaughlin authorized technical spying on nearly everyone, torture, rendition of suspects so they could be tortured by others, random killing of “profiled” foreigners and targeted killing of American citizens. Brennan was in charge of a “kill list” for President Barack Obama.

    Former Reagan Assistant Treasury Secretary Paul Craig Roberts meanwhile asks why liberal international organizations like Amnesty International are fundraising to oppose Trump when the real threat to a better and safer world and country is coming from the largely unaccountable “security agencies, the police, the neoconservatives, the presstitute media and the Republican and Democratic Parties?”

    Antiwar activist Justin Raimondo also picks up the gauntlet, describing how the national security agencies and the Democratic Party have joined forces to create a totally false narrative that could lead to nuclear war. They and the media appear to truly believe that “…the country has been taken over by Vladimir Putin and the Russian State…Trump is an instrument in their hands, and the independence of the United States has been fatally compromised: the president and his top aides are taking their orders from the Kremlin.” He concludes that “Our intelligence agencies are at war with the executive branch of government…to reverse the [2016] election results.” Raimondo believes that Trump is being particularly targeted because his unpredictability and populism threaten the wealth and power of the elites and he notes “If you think they’ve ruled out assassination you’re being naïve.”

    Raimondo believes that something like a civil war is coming, with the war party Establishment fighting to defend its privileged global order while many other Americans seek a return to normal nationhood with all that implies. If true, the next few years will see a major internal conflict that will determine what kind of country the United States will be.

    Reprinted with permission from Strategic Culture Foundation.
  31. Site: RT - News
    4 hours 59 min ago
    Author: RT
    A group of international artists have been fined and handed prison terms for staging a “performance” at the Auschwitz death camp last year, during which they undressed themselves and slaughtered a sheep.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  32. Site: RT - News
    5 hours 1 min ago
    Author: RT
    Pope Francis has performed his first ever airborne wedding after two flight attendants tied the knot while aboard a domestic flight in Chile.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  33. Site: RT - News
    5 hours 15 min ago
    Author: RT
    Extreme winds have lashed northern Europe, killing two people in The Netherlands and bringing transport chaos to parts of Germany.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  34. Site: Catholic Herald
    5 hours 40 min ago
    Author: Associated Press

    Pope Francis has celebrated the first-ever airborne papal wedding, marrying two flight attendants from Chile’s flagship airline during a flight from Santiago. Bride Paola Podesta and groom Carlos Ciuffardi said “I do” Thursday morning after telling Francis that they had been married in a civil service in 2010. However they said they were unable to follow up with a church ceremony...

    Source

  35. Site: southern orders
    5 hours 57 min ago

    This is a good comment from another post and raises legitimate questions:

    Anonymous has left a new comment on your post "THERE ARE THOSE WHO THINK THAT THE PRE-VATICAN II ...":

    There had to be serious serious problems in the Church prior to Vatican II (I am talking about clergy and religious only) because how would you explain the devistation that occurred.

    Look at the priesthood in 1963 and the look at it in 1966. Totally different. The same priest in 1963 said Mass reverently and was neatly dressed and conducted himself as a gentleman and a CATHOLIC priest. Fast forward to 1965 and the same man has long hair, is taking incredible liberties with the Mass, is questioning everything and is open to any crazy thing that comes down the road accept the truths of the Faith.

    Let’s say that picture in the article of the Sisters of St. Joseph was taken in the early 1960’s. By the end of the decade the majority of those sisters were militants who openly opposed the Faith and corrupted the innocent children in their care with their nonsense. Something is wrong with that.

    Stable people do not completely change their way of thinking and way of life so radically in so short a time as one year.

    Look at the history of the Church in those days. There is a major difference in the Catholicism of 1963 compared to that of 1965. I am convinced that what happened was no accident. Destruction like that had to have been carefully planned years in advance. Using reason dictates that the decline that what we have seen happen so rapidly in the Church, literally from 1 year to another was diabolical and planned. What other explaination is there? The Holy Spirit is NOT the author of destruction and confusion or surprises. The Holy Spirit is a rational divine being not a sentimental feel good Jesuitical hippie from Latin America.

    One the outside the Church looked wonderful but there is no way solidly formed nuns went from being Sr. Mary Benedict in a full length habit one year, to swigging Peggy in jeans and picket signs the next. That’s kind of behaviour is not how a mature well balanced adult behaves. It’s just not. The problems must have been extremely severe. 


    My comments: The period which anonymous refers to, 1963 to 1966 or better yet 1968  has interesting demographics for the priesthood and religious life. There were a huge number of very young priests and religious many of whom entered seminary or convents at the age of 14 if not younger. What kept them in line and mature looking was the strict discipline of the Church and their superiors who were older and seasoned. They had strict maternal and paternal supervisors and they had to tow the line or be kicked out.

    Thus when Vatican II's tornado hit, everything that underpinned the strict and sometimes authoritarianism of the priesthood and religoius life was swept away as though a fire department hose washed away the foundations of the seminaries, convents, priesthood and seminary life.

    Those in formation and newly ordained or professed let loose as the yoke of authority and yes, authoritarianism was removed.

    In my seminary which was the strictest in American UNTIL 1968, the revolution began when the long time rector who preferred the discipline was publicly disobeyed and without repercussions to the seminarians. Over what, you might ask? Coke machines added to the seminary.   They won! Then everything began to change and more freedoms came and by 1970 this seminary was unrecognizable as the same one prior to 1968. I arrived in 1976 and I can tell you it was chaos to say the least but everyone was excited about the rampant changes happening and so quickly.

    Of course the same anti-authority, anti-institutional, anti-law, anti-law enforcement was happening in America which prior to 1968 was a very strict, patriotic and authority oriented society.

    The young won the day and the old were booted and humiliated.

    VATICAN II BROUGHT ON A NEW TRIUMPHALISM AND ARROGANCE UNSEEN PRIOR TO VATICAN II. CHANGE ALWAYS MEANT NEW AND IMPROVED WHEN IN FACT IT WAS NOT IMPROVED BUT IT WAS CHANGE.

    THE CHURCH BECAME MORE DEMOCRATIC AND MOST MAJOR CHANGES IN RELIGIOUS LIFE OCCURRED THROUGH VOTES OF YOUNG MEMBERS WHO ONCE THEY CHANGED THEIR ORDERS FOR THE WORST, DEPARTED BY GETTING MARRIED OR SIMPLY LIVING SECULAR LIVES.

    THE DEMOCRATIZATION OF PARISH LIFE THROUGH COUNCILS AND COMMITTEES DEFORMED PARISHES AND THEIR LITURGIES AND TURNED AUTHORITY UPSIDE DOWN.

    MOST OF THIS WAS WELL MEANING AND NOT MEAN SPIRITED. BUT IT WAS A DISASTER THAT HAPPENED OVER NIGHT AND BECAUSE OF THE YOUNG WHO WERE IMMATURE AND THE INSTITUTIONAL CHURCH SAYING "GO FOR IT AND EXPERIMENT AND HAVE A GAY OLD TIME IN THE PROCESS!"
  36. Site: Novus Motus Liturgicus
    6 hours 56 sec ago
    The church of St Dominic in Youngstown, Ohio, will hold a solemn Mass in the Dominican Rite on the feast of the Purification, starting at 7 pm. The church is located at 77 East Lucius Avenue.


  37. Site: Ron Paul Institute for Peace And Prosperity
    6 hours 13 min ago
    Author: Jeff Deist


    The rise of Trump has dredged up old and bitter debates surrounding the concept of "America First," a position Trump frequently advocates almost unconsciously and using his own peculiar terms. Consider this tweet, from 2013, as an example of Trump expressing a populist, America First sentiment regarding both domestic and foreign policy in a few short words:



    Most progressives, neo-conservatives, and neo-liberals view this development with alarm and disdain, equating America-centric sentiment as inherently xenophobic, isolationist, and utterly incompatible with America's role as the unquestioned arbiter of world affairs. In their minds Trump harkens back to the bad old days of the America First Committee and Charles Lindbergh, days of suspicious small-mindedness and nationalism. In their eyes, America First is the cry of the Babbitts, the John Birchers, and the Deplorables. Only a provincial fool, one who fails to grasp the complexity of the modern world, could support Trump's retreat into a mythical world where America worries mostly about her own.

    Some conservatives, libertarians, anti-war doves, and pro-Trump populists disagree, arguing that Trump's inward turn is exactly what is needed in a country with $20 trillion in debt and a war in Afghanistan running longer than any other in US history. Globalism, at least the political sort, has eroded American sovereignty and diminished our sense of any shared American experience. But even with Trump's revolution lurching about this is a distinctly minority viewpoint. The American media, universities, and corporate boardrooms are aligned against it, not to mention the Deep State and leaders of both political parties. 

    But it remains worthwhile to consider the case for humility, rather than nativism and nationalism, as the foundation for a less ambitious and kinder set of policies—one that considers America First from the perspective of a restrained nation offering goodwill rather than direction to the world. Leave it to Silent Cal, speaking before an American Legion convention in 1925, to state the case plainly yet eloquently*: The generally expressed desire of "America first" can not be criticized. It is a perfectly correct aspiration for our people to cherish. But the problem which we have to solve is how to make America first. It can not be done by the cultivation of national bigotry, arrogance, or selfishness. Hatreds, jealousies, and suspicions will not be productive of any benefits in this direction. Here again we must apply the rule of toleration. Because there are other peoples whose ways are not our ways, and whose thoughts are not our thoughts, we are not warranted in drawing the conclusion that they are adding nothing to the sum of civilization.

    We can make little contribution to the welfare of humanity on the theory that we are a superior people and all others are an inferior people. We do not need to be too loud in the assertion of our own righteousness. It is true that we live under most favorable circumstances.

    But before we come to the final and irrevocable decision that we are better than everybody else we need to consider what we might do if we had their provocations and their difficulties. We are not likely to improve our own condition or help humanity very much until we come to the sympathetic understanding that human nature is about the same everywhere, that it is rather evenly distributed over the surface of the earth, and that we are all united in a common brotherhood.

    We can only make America first in the true sense which that means by cultivating a spirit of friendship and good will, by the exercise of the virtues of patience and forbearance, by being "plenteous in mercy," and through progress at home and helpfulness abroad standing as an example of real service to humanity. This is the point Ron Paul worked valiantly to make in 2008 and 2012, with his audacious references to the Golden Rule and calls for American to lead by example rather than force. It's at the core of what Murray Rothbard called the "key to the whole libertarian business," the foundational question of war and peace. We believe in liberty not because we know what's best for the world, but precisely because we don't know— and neither do politicians and elites. Washington, DC cannot competently address the needs and hopes of 320 million Americans, much less 7.5 billion people around the world. Humility, rather than hubris, compel us to advocate market cooperation, voluntary civil society, and peace rather than top-down political control. But hubris is at the core of everything the state does, and it's at the core of the worldview of those who hate Ron Paul precisely because he challenged the federal state's omniscience in his campaign. Given the state of affairs here at home, and our simmering domestic Cold Civil War, perhaps 2018 should be the year America takes a break from lecturing down to, bribing, cajoling, threatening, and warring with the rest of the world.

    *h/t to The Federalist for unearthing this great speech.

    Reprinted with permission from the Mises Institute.
  38. Site: Ron Paul Institute for Peace And Prosperity
    6 hours 13 min ago
    Author: Jeff Deist


    The rise of Trump has dredged up old and bitter debates surrounding the concept of "America First," a position Trump frequently advocates almost unconsciously and using his own peculiar terms. Consider this tweet, from 2013, as an example of Trump expressing a populist, America First sentiment regarding both domestic and foreign policy in a few short words:



    Most progressives, neo-conservatives, and neo-liberals view this development with alarm and disdain, equating America-centric sentiment as inherently xenophobic, isolationist, and utterly incompatible with America's role as the unquestioned arbiter of world affairs. In their minds Trump harkens back to the bad old days of the America First Committee and Charles Lindbergh, days of suspicious small-mindedness and nationalism. In their eyes, America First is the cry of the Babbitts, the John Birchers, and the Deplorables. Only a provincial fool, one who fails to grasp the complexity of the modern world, could support Trump's retreat into a mythical world where America worries mostly about her own.

    Some conservatives, libertarians, anti-war doves, and pro-Trump populists disagree, arguing that Trump's inward turn is exactly what is needed in a country with $20 trillion in debt and a war in Afghanistan running longer than any other in US history. Globalism, at least the political sort, has eroded American sovereignty and diminished our sense of any shared American experience. But even with Trump's revolution lurching about this is a distinctly minority viewpoint. The American media, universities, and corporate boardrooms are aligned against it, not to mention the Deep State and leaders of both political parties. 

    But it remains worthwhile to consider the case for humility, rather than nativism and nationalism, as the foundation for a less ambitious and kinder set of policies—one that considers America First from the perspective of a restrained nation offering goodwill rather than direction to the world. Leave it to Silent Cal, speaking before an American Legion convention in 1925, to state the case plainly yet eloquently*: The generally expressed desire of "America first" can not be criticized. It is a perfectly correct aspiration for our people to cherish. But the problem which we have to solve is how to make America first. It can not be done by the cultivation of national bigotry, arrogance, or selfishness. Hatreds, jealousies, and suspicions will not be productive of any benefits in this direction. Here again we must apply the rule of toleration. Because there are other peoples whose ways are not our ways, and whose thoughts are not our thoughts, we are not warranted in drawing the conclusion that they are adding nothing to the sum of civilization.

    We can make little contribution to the welfare of humanity on the theory that we are a superior people and all others are an inferior people. We do not need to be too loud in the assertion of our own righteousness. It is true that we live under most favorable circumstances.

    But before we come to the final and irrevocable decision that we are better than everybody else we need to consider what we might do if we had their provocations and their difficulties. We are not likely to improve our own condition or help humanity very much until we come to the sympathetic understanding that human nature is about the same everywhere, that it is rather evenly distributed over the surface of the earth, and that we are all united in a common brotherhood.

    We can only make America first in the true sense which that means by cultivating a spirit of friendship and good will, by the exercise of the virtues of patience and forbearance, by being "plenteous in mercy," and through progress at home and helpfulness abroad standing as an example of real service to humanity. This is the point Ron Paul worked valiantly to make in 2008 and 2012, with his audacious references to the Golden Rule and calls for American to lead by example rather than force. It's at the core of what Murray Rothbard called the "key to the whole libertarian business," the foundational question of war and peace. We believe in liberty not because we know what's best for the world, but precisely because we don't know— and neither do politicians and elites. Washington, DC cannot competently address the needs and hopes of 320 million Americans, much less 7.5 billion people around the world. Humility, rather than hubris, compel us to advocate market cooperation, voluntary civil society, and peace rather than top-down political control. But hubris is at the core of everything the state does, and it's at the core of the worldview of those who hate Ron Paul precisely because he challenged the federal state's omniscience in his campaign. Given the state of affairs here at home, and our simmering domestic Cold Civil War, perhaps 2018 should be the year America takes a break from lecturing down to, bribing, cajoling, threatening, and warring with the rest of the world.

    *h/t to The Federalist for unearthing this great speech.

    Reprinted with permission from the Mises Institute.
  39. Site: Ron Paul Institute for Peace And Prosperity
    6 hours 13 min ago
    Author: Jeff Deist


    The rise of Trump has dredged up old and bitter debates surrounding the concept of "America First," a position Trump frequently advocates almost unconsciously and using his own peculiar terms. Consider this tweet, from 2013, as an example of Trump expressing a populist, America First sentiment regarding both domestic and foreign policy in a few short words:



    Most progressives, neo-conservatives, and neo-liberals view this development with alarm and disdain, equating America-centric sentiment as inherently xenophobic, isolationist, and utterly incompatible with America's role as the unquestioned arbiter of world affairs. In their minds Trump harkens back to the bad old days of the America First Committee and Charles Lindbergh, days of suspicious small-mindedness and nationalism. In their eyes, America First is the cry of the Babbitts, the John Birchers, and the Deplorables. Only a provincial fool, one who fails to grasp the complexity of the modern world, could support Trump's retreat into a mythical world where America worries mostly about her own.

    Some conservatives, libertarians, anti-war doves, and pro-Trump populists disagree, arguing that Trump's inward turn is exactly what is needed in a country with $20 trillion in debt and a war in Afghanistan running longer than any other in US history. Globalism, at least the political sort, has eroded American sovereignty and diminished our sense of any shared American experience. But even with Trump's revolution lurching about this is a distinctly minority viewpoint. The American media, universities, and corporate boardrooms are aligned against it, not to mention the Deep State and leaders of both political parties. 

    But it remains worthwhile to consider the case for humility, rather than nativism and nationalism, as the foundation for a less ambitious and kinder set of policies—one that considers America First from the perspective of a restrained nation offering goodwill rather than direction to the world. Leave it to Silent Cal, speaking before an American Legion convention in 1925, to state the case plainly yet eloquently*: The generally expressed desire of "America first" can not be criticized. It is a perfectly correct aspiration for our people to cherish. But the problem which we have to solve is how to make America first. It can not be done by the cultivation of national bigotry, arrogance, or selfishness. Hatreds, jealousies, and suspicions will not be productive of any benefits in this direction. Here again we must apply the rule of toleration. Because there are other peoples whose ways are not our ways, and whose thoughts are not our thoughts, we are not warranted in drawing the conclusion that they are adding nothing to the sum of civilization.

    We can make little contribution to the welfare of humanity on the theory that we are a superior people and all others are an inferior people. We do not need to be too loud in the assertion of our own righteousness. It is true that we live under most favorable circumstances.

    But before we come to the final and irrevocable decision that we are better than everybody else we need to consider what we might do if we had their provocations and their difficulties. We are not likely to improve our own condition or help humanity very much until we come to the sympathetic understanding that human nature is about the same everywhere, that it is rather evenly distributed over the surface of the earth, and that we are all united in a common brotherhood.

    We can only make America first in the true sense which that means by cultivating a spirit of friendship and good will, by the exercise of the virtues of patience and forbearance, by being "plenteous in mercy," and through progress at home and helpfulness abroad standing as an example of real service to humanity. This is the point Ron Paul worked valiantly to make in 2008 and 2012, with his audacious references to the Golden Rule and calls for American to lead by example rather than force. It's at the core of what Murray Rothbard called the "key to the whole libertarian business," the foundational question of war and peace. We believe in liberty not because we know what's best for the world, but precisely because we don't know— and neither do politicians and elites. Washington, DC cannot competently address the needs and hopes of 320 million Americans, much less 7.5 billion people around the world. Humility, rather than hubris, compel us to advocate market cooperation, voluntary civil society, and peace rather than top-down political control. But hubris is at the core of everything the state does, and it's at the core of the worldview of those who hate Ron Paul precisely because he challenged the federal state's omniscience in his campaign. Given the state of affairs here at home, and our simmering domestic Cold Civil War, perhaps 2018 should be the year America takes a break from lecturing down to, bribing, cajoling, threatening, and warring with the rest of the world.

    *h/t to The Federalist for unearthing this great speech.

    Reprinted with permission from the Mises Institute.
  40. Site: Ron Paul Institute for Peace And Prosperity
    6 hours 13 min ago
    Author: Jeff Deist


    The rise of Trump has dredged up old and bitter debates surrounding the concept of "America First," a position Trump frequently advocates almost unconsciously and using his own peculiar terms. Consider this tweet, from 2013, as an example of Trump expressing a populist, America First sentiment regarding both domestic and foreign policy in a few short words:



    Most progressives, neo-conservatives, and neo-liberals view this development with alarm and disdain, equating America-centric sentiment as inherently xenophobic, isolationist, and utterly incompatible with America's role as the unquestioned arbiter of world affairs. In their minds Trump harkens back to the bad old days of the America First Committee and Charles Lindbergh, days of suspicious small-mindedness and nationalism. In their eyes, America First is the cry of the Babbitts, the John Birchers, and the Deplorables. Only a provincial fool, one who fails to grasp the complexity of the modern world, could support Trump's retreat into a mythical world where America worries mostly about her own.

    Some conservatives, libertarians, anti-war doves, and pro-Trump populists disagree, arguing that Trump's inward turn is exactly what is needed in a country with $20 trillion in debt and a war in Afghanistan running longer than any other in US history. Globalism, at least the political sort, has eroded American sovereignty and diminished our sense of any shared American experience. But even with Trump's revolution lurching about this is a distinctly minority viewpoint. The American media, universities, and corporate boardrooms are aligned against it, not to mention the Deep State and leaders of both political parties. 

    But it remains worthwhile to consider the case for humility, rather than nativism and nationalism, as the foundation for a less ambitious and kinder set of policies—one that considers America First from the perspective of a restrained nation offering goodwill rather than direction to the world. Leave it to Silent Cal, speaking before an American Legion convention in 1925, to state the case plainly yet eloquently*: The generally expressed desire of "America first" can not be criticized. It is a perfectly correct aspiration for our people to cherish. But the problem which we have to solve is how to make America first. It can not be done by the cultivation of national bigotry, arrogance, or selfishness. Hatreds, jealousies, and suspicions will not be productive of any benefits in this direction. Here again we must apply the rule of toleration. Because there are other peoples whose ways are not our ways, and whose thoughts are not our thoughts, we are not warranted in drawing the conclusion that they are adding nothing to the sum of civilization.

    We can make little contribution to the welfare of humanity on the theory that we are a superior people and all others are an inferior people. We do not need to be too loud in the assertion of our own righteousness. It is true that we live under most favorable circumstances.

    But before we come to the final and irrevocable decision that we are better than everybody else we need to consider what we might do if we had their provocations and their difficulties. We are not likely to improve our own condition or help humanity very much until we come to the sympathetic understanding that human nature is about the same everywhere, that it is rather evenly distributed over the surface of the earth, and that we are all united in a common brotherhood.

    We can only make America first in the true sense which that means by cultivating a spirit of friendship and good will, by the exercise of the virtues of patience and forbearance, by being "plenteous in mercy," and through progress at home and helpfulness abroad standing as an example of real service to humanity. This is the point Ron Paul worked valiantly to make in 2008 and 2012, with his audacious references to the Golden Rule and calls for American to lead by example rather than force. It's at the core of what Murray Rothbard called the "key to the whole libertarian business," the foundational question of war and peace. We believe in liberty not because we know what's best for the world, but precisely because we don't know— and neither do politicians and elites. Washington, DC cannot competently address the needs and hopes of 320 million Americans, much less 7.5 billion people around the world. Humility, rather than hubris, compel us to advocate market cooperation, voluntary civil society, and peace rather than top-down political control. But hubris is at the core of everything the state does, and it's at the core of the worldview of those who hate Ron Paul precisely because he challenged the federal state's omniscience in his campaign. Given the state of affairs here at home, and our simmering domestic Cold Civil War, perhaps 2018 should be the year America takes a break from lecturing down to, bribing, cajoling, threatening, and warring with the rest of the world.

    *h/t to The Federalist for unearthing this great speech.

    Reprinted with permission from the Mises Institute.
  41. Site: southern orders
    6 hours 21 min ago
    Here you go, statistical proof that the liberalizing forces of Vatican II, be that in fact or in spirit, destroyed the high percentage of Catholics, in this case women, who attend Mass!

    This photo is independent of the story from CNS below but tells us of the malaise in the Catholic Church in Chile. This is a photo of Pope Francis' meeting with youth in Chile. It is sad and very telling. Even Pope Benedict would have had more kids and Pope St. John Paul II....sad to say the least! The popemobile is toward the left side of the photo as Pope Francis makes his triumphal tour around the throngs!

    Survey: Only 24% of Catholic Women Attend Mass WeeklyCNS News 15 hours ago (CNSNews.com) -- A new survey shows that only 24% of Catholic women of all ages in America attend Mass once a week -- Sunday Mass attendance is mandatory in Catholic teaching -- but for those women born prior to the liberal reforms of Vatican II, a higher percentage (53%) of them go to Mass weekly. The survey, conducted Aug. 3 - 24, 2017, was carried out by CARA (Center for Applied Research), a social science division at Georgetown University. CARA interviewed 1,508 self-identifying Catholic women by telephone and online. The results were released this week.  The survey results indictae there are 37.3 million Catholic females in the United States, among which 28.8 million are adults.  When asked, ...
    Read more
  42. Site: Catholic Herald
    6 hours 22 min ago
    Author: Simon Caldwell

    Belgian nurses and social workers who specialise in treating dying patients are quitting their jobs because palliative care units are being turned into “houses of euthanasia”, a senior doctor has alleged. Increasing numbers of hospital staff employed in the palliative care sector are abandoning their posts because they did not wish to be reduced to preparing “patients and their families for lethal...

    Source

  43. Site: RT - News
    6 hours 26 min ago
    Author: RT
    The Syrian government warned Turkey against launching a bombing campaign in the Syrian province of Afrin, saying its air defenses may be used. Ankara had threatened airstrikes against Afrin-based Kurdish militias.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  44. Site: RT - News
    6 hours 37 min ago
    Author: RT
    At least 120 inmates of a prison in northern France are refusing to return to their cells, the jail’s administration said as cited by French media. The incident follows a recent series of assaults on prison guards by convicts.
    Read Full Article at RT.com
  45. Site: southern orders
    7 hours 14 min ago
    The Highly-Anticipated 2017 Fake News AwardsTEAM GOP - January 17, 20182017 was a year of unrelenting bias, unfair news coverage, and even downright fake news. Studies have shown that over 90% of the media’s coverage of President Trump is negative.Below are the winners of the 2017 Fake News Awards.1. The New York Times’ Paul Krugman claimed on the day of President Trump’s historic, landslide victory that the economy would never recover.
     2. ABC News' Brian Ross CHOKES and sends markets in a downward spiral with false report.
     
     3. CNN FALSELY reported that candidate Donald Trump and his son Donald J. Trump, Jr. had access to hacked documents from WikiLeaks.
    (via Fox News)
     4. TIME FALSELY reported that President Trump removed a bust of Martin Luther King, Jr. from the Oval Office.
     5. Washington Post FALSELY reported the President’s massive sold-out rally in Pensacola, Florida was empty. Dishonest reporter showed picture of empty arena HOURS before crowd started pouring in.6. CNN FALSELY edited a video to make it appear President Trump defiantly overfed fish during a visit with the Japanese prime minister. Japanese prime minister actually led the way with the feeding.
     7. CNN FALSELY reported about Anthony Scaramucci’s meeting with a Russian, but retracted it due to a “significant breakdown in process.”
    (via washingtonpost.com)
     8. Newsweek FALSELY reported that Polish First Lady Agata Kornhauser-Duda did not shake President Trump’s hand.
     9. CNN FALSELY reported that former FBI Director James Comey would dispute President Trump’s claim that he was told he is not under investigation.
     10. The New York Times FALSELY claimed on the front page that the Trump administration had hidden a climate report.
    (via WashingtonPost.com)11. And last, but not least: "RUSSIA COLLUSION!" Russian collusion is perhaps the greatest hoax perpetrated on the American people. THERE IS NO COLLUSION!
    While the media spent 90% of the time focused on negative coverage or fake news, the President has been getting results:1. The economy has created nearly 2 million jobs and gained over $8 trillion in wealth since the President’s inauguration.2. African Americans and Hispanics are enjoying the lowest unemployment rate in recorded history.3. The President signed historic tax cuts and relief for hardworking Americans not seen since President Reagan.4. President Trump’s plan to cut regulations has exceeded “2 out for every 1 in” mandate, issuing 22 deregulatory actions for every one new regulatory action.5. The President has unleashed an American energy boom by ending Obama-era regulations, approving the Keystone pipeline, auctioning off millions of new acres for energy exploration, and opening up ANWR.6. ISIS is in retreat, having been crushed in Iraq and Syria.7. President Trump followed through on his promise to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of the State of Israel and instructed the State Department to begin to relocate the Embassy.8. With President Trump’s encouragement, more member nations are paying their fair share for the common defense in the NATO alliance.9. Signed the Veterans Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act to allow senior officials in the VA to fire failing employees and establishes safeguards to protect whistleblowers.10. President Trump kept his promise and appointed Associate Justice Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court.
  46. Site: Eccles is saved
    7 hours 29 min ago
    This is the latest instalment in our self-help guide "How to be a good pope", designed to help those of our readers who may suddenly find themselves catapulted into the Chair of St Peter.

    Now, as Pope you have lots of gongs that you can hand out to your friends. For example, the Badge for Amoris Laetitia Learning and Study (BALLS) is for those who unquestioningly agree with everything Amoris Laetitia says, showing aggression when anyone asks them to explain something.

    Likewise, the St Ignatius Medal for Profoundly Lecherous Explanations (SIMPLE) is for Jesuits who suggest that naughtiness - especially between members of the same sex - is all right really; while the Francis Order of Logic (FOOL) goes to those who maintain, in the face of all opposition, that 2+2=5.

    "Look! The Pope loves me!"

    There are also some older awards that your more rigid predecessors instituted. For example the Pontifical Equestrian Order of St. Gregory the Great. These are for giving out in a "goodie-bag" to any visiting dignitaries who come to see you, together with a chocolate model of Martin Luther, a copy of Amoris Laetitia, and a comical red nose.

    Now, as Pope you are a very busy man, with lots of other duties to perform. Obviously, you've managed to save some time by cutting down the praying and worshipping, but you still have to keep your "frequent flier" platinum status, and catch up on your unanswered correspondence - some cardinals have been waiting for answers from you for over a year.

    So you delegate the award of the goodie-bag to one of your lackeys, who probably didn't bother to check the credentials of the people who received them. And here's the problem.

    "The Pope loves me too!"

    Among the lucky recipients of your latest batch of medals are five euthanasiacs, four torturers, three war criminals, two serial killers, and an abortionist in a pear tree. Well, that's fairly normal, if you will insist on giving awards to politicians. But it's embarrassing.

    Your critics are going to say, "The Pope should withdraw the honour. The buck stops here. We don't think he's very pro-life anyway. Remember Emma Bananas?"

    Your fans are going to say, "Of course he knew nothing about it, and will never find out, as he doesn't read the paper, and anyway he's far too busy partying in Chile right now, and have you noticed that it's always the same people who criticise the Pope? The rigid ones who believe in Christian doctrine! Didn't you read America's latest survey in which 99% of women who never go to church said he was a living saint? Now get lost, I've got to practise the piano."

    Playing the piano versus populum, as recommended by Vatican II.

    And you? What will you do? Why, nothing of course. You're in Chile, where they don't have the internet, or newspapers, or telephones. And by the time you get back there will be some new scandal to amuse people. Well done!

  47. Site: Catholic Herald
    7 hours 36 min ago
    Author: Michael Davis

    The BBC’s Father Brown is an admirable addition to the proud tradition of British crime dramas. It’s set in the idyllic village of Kembleford, where roughly three quarters of residents sit in the House of Lords. No one seems to mind that the leading cause of death is bludgeoning or that the police come dangerously close to hanging innocents at least once a week. The economy is comprised entirely...

    Source

  48. Site: Catholic Herald
    7 hours 36 min ago
    Author: Ed Condon

    Last year Britain marked the 50th anniversary of the Abortion Act. Given how often we are told that “reproductive rights” are a sine qua non of modern democratic society, it was a surprisingly muted affair. There were no hashtags, no parades, no endless series of television specials. When 50 years of legal abortion was discussed, as it was on Radio 4’s Moral Maze, it was debated, not celebrated.

    Source

  49. Site: Catholic Herald
    7 hours 36 min ago
    Author: Charles A. Coulombe

    The United States has a strange love-hate relationship with the British monarchy. Freud might have seen in it a titanic Oedipus complex spanning two-and-a-half centuries. But explain it as you will, American pundits routinely jeer at the monarchy, our Irish curse it and we annually congratulate ourselves at being freed of it. At the same time, if we encounter it ourselves we go to pieces as when...

    Source

  50. Site: southern orders
    7 hours 48 min ago
     The abuse crisis is primarily a function of the clericalism of the pope and the college of bishops in union with the pope. And not just today's pope and bishops but popes and bishops in general. It is the arrogance of being more concerned with priest abusers, the arrogance of trying to forgive, heal and most egregiously of reintegrating into ministry those guilty of harming the young.

    When Pope Francis or any bishop tries to make equal the suffering or victimization of innocent priests in being stereotyped with the perverted priests, this shows a callousness to those who were abused and often in horrific ways and by a "God" figure which compounds the physical, spiritual and mental harm.

    When there is zero tolerance of bishops who put priests before victims or potential victims and the pope who alone can mandate this by being a doctor of canon law and then backing up law with swift action toward offending bishops, we will be on the right track.

    Press the title for the spot-on Crux article:
    Survivors blast pope abuse apology in Chile as ‘cheap headline’
    Pope Francis arrives to celebrate Mass at O'Higgins Park in Santiago, Chile, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. (Credit: AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko.)

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